Cosmetic surgery and conscientious objection

Francesca Minerva

Journal of Medical Ethics

Abstract

In this paper, I analyse the issue of conscientious objection in relation to cosmetic surgery. I consider cases of doctors who might refuse to perform a cosmetic treatment because: (1) the treatment aims at achieving a goal which is not in the traditional scope of cosmetic surgery; (2) the motivation of the patient to undergo the surgery is considered trivial; (3) the patient wants to use the surgery to promote moral or political values that conflict with the doctor’s ones; (4) the patient requires an intervention that would benefit himself/herself, but could damage society at large.


Minerva F. Cosmetic surgery and conscientious objection. Journal of Medical Ethics. Published Online First: 02 March 2017. doi:10.1136/medethics-2016-103804

Conscientious objection in Italy

Francesca Minerva

Journal of Medical Ethics

Abstract

The law regulating abortion in Italy gives healthcare practitioners the option to make a conscientious objection to activities that are specific and necessary to an abortive intervention. Conscientious objectors among Italian gynaecologists amount to about 70%. This means that only a few doctors are available to perform abortions, and therefore access to abortion is subject to constraints. In 2012 the International Planned Parenthood Federation European Network (IPPF EN) lodged a complaint against Italy to the European Committee of Social Rights, claiming that the inadequate protection of the right to access abortion implies a violation of the right to health. In this paper I will discuss the Italian situation with respect to conscientious objection to abortion and I will suggest possible solutions to the problem.


Minerva F. Conscientious objection in Italy. J Med Ethics doi:10.1136/medethics-2013-101656