Warning: Undefined array key "00" in E:\vhosts\consciencelaws.org\library.consciencelaws.org\wp-includes\class-wp-locale.php on line 321

Warning: Undefined array key "00" in E:\vhosts\consciencelaws.org\library.consciencelaws.org\wp-includes\class-wp-locale.php on line 321

Warning: Undefined array key "00" in E:\vhosts\consciencelaws.org\library.consciencelaws.org\wp-includes\class-wp-locale.php on line 321
0 - Protection of Conscience Project Library
Warning: Undefined array key "00" in E:\vhosts\consciencelaws.org\library.consciencelaws.org\wp-includes\class-wp-locale.php on line 321

Warning: Undefined array key "00" in E:\vhosts\consciencelaws.org\library.consciencelaws.org\wp-includes\class-wp-locale.php on line 321

(News) Bombing of Toronto abortion clinic raises stakes in bitter debate

Gordon Bagley

Canadian Medical Association Journal, CMAJ
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Extract
The abortion clinic that Dr. Henry Morgentaler operated on Harbord Street in Toronto was an electronic fortress bristling with hidden cameras, burglary shock sensors and motion detectors, but the security measures were of little use last May 18. At about 3:23 on that Monday morning, a security camera filmed two shadowy characters approaching the clinic’s back door. The visitors, heavily disguised, used a drill to bore through the door lock. They poured gasoline into the clinic, let it aerosolize, and then used a Roman candle to ignite the fumes. In the resulting explosion the entire front wall of the two-storey structure shuddered, buckling building supports and flinging glass, bricks and other debris into the street. Fortunately, no one was injured – the street was deserted. Six months later, Toronto police seem no closer to finding the terrorists. . . . [lengthy article].


Bagley G. Bombing of Toronto abortion clinic raises stakes in bitter debate. Can Med Assoc J. 1992;147(10):1528-1533.

(Correspondence) Readers Advocate Pro-conscience, Not Pro-Choice (Invited response)

Susan Wysocki

The Nurse Practitioner
The Nurse Practitioner

Extract
A nurse practitioner’s personal position on this issue is irrelevant in tem1s of the provision of patient care. Our responsibility as nurse practitioners is to provide our patients with information that helps them to make their own decisions based on the constructs of their own beliefs and needs. This does not mean that nurse practitioners who find a patient’s reproductive-health decisions to be in conflict with their own morals and beliefs should be forced to counsel on those choices. Instead, they have a responsibility to ensure that the patient has her needs met with another provider.


Wysocki S. (Correspondence) Readers Advocate Pro-conscience, Not Pro-Choice (Invited response). Nurse Pract. 1992 Oct;17(10):8-9

(Correspondence) Readers Advocate Pro-conscience, Not Pro-choice

(Author reply)

Lynn C Barnard

The Nurse Practitioner
The Nurse Practitioner

Extract
“Let those nurses who oppose abortion and choice dedicate their energies to the development of a societal system that truly cares for women and will support their decisions – no matter what they are.”


Barnard LC. (Correspondence) Readers Advocate Pro-conscience, Not Pro-choice (Author reply). Nurse Pract. 1992;17(10):8

(Correspondence) Responsibility and abortion

Glenn Jones

Canadian Medical Association Journal, CMAJ
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Extract
Termination of pregnancy is the act of a powerful person (the pregnant woman) against a voiceless, innocent and powerless person. How does the misuse of power by women in this situation prove that their androgynous and gynocentric approaches to the use of power are different or better? . . . I agree with McEvoy that we must determine what abortion means over time to those most affected by it – women. However, she has failed to do that analysis.


Jones G. (Correspondence) Responsibility and abortion. Can Med Assoc J. 1992 Sep 15;147(6):840-842.

Religious Ethics and Active Euthanasia in a Pluralistic Society

Courtney S Campbell

Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Abstract
This article sets out a descriptive typology of religious perspectives on legalized euthanasia — political advocacy, individual conscience, silence, embedded opposition, and formal public opposition — and then examines the normative basis for these perspectives through the themes of sovereignty, stewardship, and the self. It also explores the public relevance of these religious perspectives for debates over legalized euthanasia, particularly in the realm of public policy. Ironically, the moral discourse of religious traditions on euthanasia may gain public relevance at the expense of its religious content. Nonetheless, religious traditions can provide a context of ultimacy and meaning to this debate, which is a condition for genuine pluralism.


Campbell CS. Religious Ethics and Active Euthanasia in a Pluralistic Society. Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 1992;2(3):253-277.

The Hospital Ethics Committee: Health Care’s Moral Conscience or White Elephant?

David C Blake

The Hastings Center Report
The Hastings Center Report

Abstract
In a morally fragmented society there is no good reason for ethics committees to assume any particular point of view, yet failure to do so compromises their ability to function in either a case-review or an educational capacity. A casuist methodology might enable committees to fulfill both roles.


Blake DC. The Hospital Ethics Committee: Health Care’s Moral Conscience or White Elephant?. Hastings Cent Rep. 1992;22(1):6-11.